Knuckleball Grips, Part 1

The foundation of any great knuckleball is the grip, but there is a lot of confusion out there about proper knuckleball grips. Now, I say knuckleball grips because there is more than one way to hold a knuckleball, mainly because all of our hands are unique. But that doesn’t mean that you can hold the knuckleball any which way you’d like. There are certain key points to a knuckleball grip that can’t be ignored.

I have had the privelage of working with the greatest knuckleballers alive today — RA Dickey, Charlie Hough, Phil Niekro and Tom Candiotti. These guys broke into the Major Leagues and stayed there, enjoying long and fruitful careers. And they all hold their knuckleball similarly. It’s these similarities that make up the key points of a great knuckleball grip.

No Funky Grip

Charlie Zink and his Funky Grip

And, yes, there have been guys who have gotten to the Major Leagues with funky grips, like Charlie Zink and Jared Fernandez. These guys held the ball differently; much differently than the guys mentioned above that enjoyed those long careers. So there is some evidence that unconventional knuckleball grips work. But the careers of Zink and Fernandez were short. In fact, Zink only pitched one game in the Major Leagues, earning himself a 16.62 ERA in the process. Fernandez fared a little better, getting into 31 Major League games with a 9.95 ERA. So, I think we can trust the “key points” found in the conventionally successful grips of Dickey, Hough, Niekro and Candiotti.

Fingertips, Not Knuckles

Joe Niekro showing the proper fingertip grip

The first and most obvious thing to discuss is that the knuckleball is thrown with the fingertips and fingernails, not the knuckles as the name of the pitch would suggest. Great knuckle ball pitchers curl their fingers around to make hooks and then they dig their fingernails into the rawhide of the ball.  And when the ball is thrown, the fingertips guide the ball; applying pressure at just the right moment to send the ball flying without any spin.

The greats — Dickey, Hough, Niekro and Candiotti — all use their fingertips. Zink and Fernandez used a hybrid knuckle ball grip, using their middle-finger’s tip and the curled knuckle of their pointer finger. Again, these guys got to the show, but they didn’t stick. So use the fingertips and not the knuckles.

Improper grip using the knuckles instead of fingertips

And next time someone says they have a nasty knuckler and shows you a knuckle ball grip like this, laugh at them.

Check out the next chapter in a series about knuckleball grips coming soon! And all of this is discussed at length in the hour-long instructional DVD — Knuckleball Nation!

Then take your game to the next level with the Advanced Knuckleball and Pro Knuck instructional videos! And get into premium knuckleball shape, mentally and physically, by ordering Fingertips of a Safecracker & Mind of a Zen Buddhist!

And click here to continue on to Part 2 of the Knuckleball Grips series!
Posted by Chris Nowlin, 1 comment

Nationwide Knuckle Ball Camps

This is the first year that I have really gone out and traveled the country putting on camps. Knuckleball Nation has been seen in Connecticut, Massachusetts, Georgia, Florida, Texas,  Nevada, Arizona and California. And I hope this is just the beginning.

I’ve hit the road for a few very important reasons. This whole small business called Knuckleball Nation serves a few different purposes:

Pay it Forward

Charlie Hough took me under his wing. RA Dickey has helped me through the years. Heck, he even supplies me with knuckleball catcher’s mitts. Tom Candiotti took time out of his life to teach me a thing or two. Phil Niekro took me into a professional stadium during the off-season for some work. Many of the great knuckleballers have helped me through this journey. They’ve been generous with their time and I have taken full advantage of it, gleaning bits of wisdom from all of them.

When I hit the road. I share that wisdom, because without that wisdom, I wouldn’t have made it into the professional ranks. I would have been toiling around with the wrong approach for a long time until I finally gave up. So, when I put on a clinic, I pay forward their kindness and their teachings.

Community

I was pretty alone when I joined pro baseball. I was the oddball, the weirdo,  the guy that the pitching coach couldn’t coach. And I think every knuckleballer feels this way at one time or another. But, by putting on regional knuckleball camps, we can come together as a community. You guys can reach out to me with questions and you can form friendships, reaching out to each other through your journey. Because it is always nice to feel like you belong and I want every knuckleballer to feel like they belong to the entire Knuckleball Nation.

Accelerated Development

At each camp, you get to see me (and maybe Zach Staniewicz) throw a real-life, pro-quality knuckleball. This is going to give you a good idea of exactly what it takes to make it. And watching a pro accelerates your development. You can see how we approach the mound, how we move, where we throw the ball. And when camp begins, you can be armed with thorough questions. And, hopefully, you’ll get the answers that you are looking for.

These camps allow us, as Knuckleball Nation, to come together; to help each other out; and, hopefully, to make the knuckleball a little more mainstream. We will get a knuckleballer drafted, and we will do it together!

Posted by Chris Nowlin, 0 comments

Atlanta Camp Footage


One thing you, as a member of Knuckleball Nation, get when you attend one of our camps is a personalized training video. You get filmed in super slow-motion with a specialized camera that films at 120 frames per second. That means your delivery, which takes only a few seconds to complete, gets lengthened out to about 30 seconds of smooth footage. This really helps to develop your knuckleball in a variety of ways.

First, is that we can see all the key points in the delivery — whether or not you’re using your whole back foot for balance with good dorsi flexion, whether you continue that balance with the proper front foot strike; we get to see the action of your back knee, how your hips drive the delivery, whether or not your back shoulder stays where it is supposed to stay, and we can see the release. The holy grail of the knuckleball, what everyone is searching for when trying to develop this pitch, is the release: you have to “get through the ball,” as Charlie Hough would say.

Now, getting through the ball is a very difficult thing to do and it is even more difficult thing to see in real-speed. But slow-mo video allows us to take a look at exactly what is happening through the knuckleball’s release. It is an objective learning tool that can help you learn how to release the knuckleball like a pro.

Of course, the release of the knuckleball is just a product of the house you’ve built. Your mechanics, more than any other pitch, need to be knuckleball-specific and flawless. Otherwise, you are going to toil with inconsistency, blindly performing the mechanics correctly one day and missing a step on another day. And without being able to correctly identify the problem by knowing all the steps, from the feet up, you are going to have wildly successful days peppered into a bunch of mediocre and bad days.

So check out the video above and see if you can tell how well everyone’s delivery is put together!

Posted by Chris Nowlin

Knuck Nation Camps 2015!

Nation – I have been pretty busy. I’ve taken about three months off of throwing and am just starting to get back into the swing of it. I consider myself lucky to live in LA where I get to throw outside year-round while the rest of the country gets slammed with a winter freeze.

And as I get back into throwing, I am re-invigorated. I love the challenge of getting better and making my way towards the Major Leagues. AND I enjoy throwing, talking and working on pitching with fellow knuckleballers. There’s nothing like the energy that comes from a bunch of guys getting together to work on the same goal.

With that in mind, I am proud to announce Knuckleball Nation’s country-wide tour starting in 2015. I will be making my way to different cities across the US to run camps, share my wisdom and, hopefully, help bring the knuckleball community together. After all, I started this website in order to help make the knuckleball mainstream by connecting those around the glove that enjoy throwing the pitch.

The first every East Coast camp for Knuckleball Nation will be taking place in Atlanta, Georgia, at the end of January. We’ll be getting together at an Atlanta indoor baseball facility on Saturday, January 24th, and we’ll wrap the camp up on Sunday morning, January 25th. But, don’t worry if you can only make one day; you’ll be able to register for just the 24th or the 25th.

Later on, in March, we’ll be running the same style of camp in Boston. Again, running in the afternoon on Saturday and the morning on Sunday so that knuckleballers have a chance to fly in on the morning of Saturday and fly out during the evening on Sunday without missing a beat.

More camps may be announced if there is enough demand. So, if you’re interested, send me an email, text or call. Perhaps you’ll get me flying to a city near you to throw some knuckleballs. For dates and to register, click HERE.

Posted by Chris Nowlin in News

New Knuckleball Products

Chris Nowlin throwing a warm-up knuckleball before a single-A level baseball game

Nation, I have been inundated with a bunch of demand. You guys have gone out, watched the instructional DVD and now you are thirsty for more answers. You want to know the ins and outs of the knuckleball. You want to know how to manipulate the movement without changing your arm action. You want to know how to change speeds and just how to release the pitch.

And you’ve signed up for the Las Vegas Camp in droves to get those answers. But not all of you are able to get out to the desert this Fall. That is why I chose to expand the products list on the Knuckleball Nation website.

You can now purchase a DVD called Advanced Knuckleballing – an Instructional DVD. This DVD builds on the foundation laid out by the original DVD, called Knuckleball Nation. Now, since we’ve got a graduated DVD system, that original DVD is now called Knuckleball 101. Make sense, right?

This new DVD, Advanced Knuckleballing, really gets into the nitty gritty. It explores all the new questions that you’ve developed watching the original instructional video. It shows you where to throw the ball depending on the weather, the runners on base, the inning and the out. It tells you how to change speeds by freezing your hips and not your arm, and it tells you how to manipulate the very movement of the knuckleball itself, which is extremely high level instruction. If you can get a grip on that, then you own the Knuckleball!

Essentially, this DVD is vital for the competitive pitcher. I take my personal, professional baseball experience and break it down for you — tell you exactly how to compete with the game’s most frustrating pitch.

If you want to be a pro, get Advanced Knuckleballing and look into an Online Video Assessment, personal lessons or look for a KNUCKLEBALL NATION Camp near you!

Posted by Chris Nowlin

Jon Huizinga, signed by Brewers at 34

Jon Huizinga throwing a pitch for the Brewers single-A team at age 34

I first met Jon Huizinga years ago. He was in his late 20’s and rehabbing quite a horrific elbow injury. In fact, he was told that he’d never play baseball again. But there he was, sitting in an indoor baseball facility in Scottsdale, Arizona, getting ready to throw a bullpen. We shook hands and talked, and we saw each other there quite a bit through that winter.

Then I got signed to play for the Lincoln Saltdogs of the American Association. He got signed by the St. Paul Saints of the very same league and I made my professional debut against his team. A few years later, we played together on the Calgary Vipers and, more recently, we were teammates in Arizona playing for the upstart Freedom League. We even got selected to participate in a baseball reality show hosted by Cal and Billy Ripken for CBS, though I don’t think that will ever air.

We’ve crossed paths quite a bit over the years and remain in touch. And as a conventional pitcher some two years older than me, I thought Jon’s professional playing days were over. His local independent league, the Freedom League, folded. And with two young kids, a profitable self-employed coaching job and a beautiful wife, I thought for certain it was done.

But he kept throwing into his Pitching Tunnels. He kept working on his body, through nutrition and new-age workouts. He kept practicing exactly what he preached. And, most importantly, he never lost his positive attitude. He believed, against all odds and reason, that he was going to make it. Every time that I saw him over the years, he’d have a smile on his face and say something along the lines, “One step closer to the Major Leagues, buddy,” and give me a high five.

And that’s where his real power shows — his positive attitude. Baseball is always fun for Zinger. A bad day at the ballpark beats the best day outside of it. And I believe that his positive attitude willed what happened last week.

Last week, against all odds, the 34-year-old signed a minor league deal with the Brewers. And he wasn’t even playing independent baseball. He didn’t get “picked up” out of a pro indy league. Rather, they just signed him because of a tryout that went well in Arizona.

Jon Huizinga’s prophecy, the one he spoke of positively every time that I saw him through the years, is coming true.

The question is, do you believe that you can do it, too?

Posted by Chris Nowlin in News

Game Footage: Knuckleball Nation Founder Chris Nowlin’s Minor League Start


I was getting ready to make a professional start here in Northern California when I noticed something different — media guys were setting up cameras all around the ballpark. I noticed that they set a camera up right behind the plate and got excited — I get to see my knuckleball from a fan’s perspective. I asked around and they told me the game would be broadcast in the San Francisco area.

So, I ordered a DVD from the TV station. I edited together a good chunk of the early part of the game, where you can see the ball best in natural light. We put a pitcher in the stands with a radar gun. So, everything you see in this video is a knuckleball ranging in velocity from 57 miles per hour to 70 miles per hour.

The funny thing was that the announcer struggled the knuckleball. In fact, he didn’t even know it was a knuckle ball until the 3rd inning. He likened me to a character in the movie Major League: Back to the Minors; a pitcher that threw so slow, his pitches didn’t register on the radar gun. He kept calling my pitches curveballs and floating change-ups, saying that my style was like that of a knuckleballer.

Then someone informs him, “Hey, dude, that’s a knuckleball!” He then starts saying how lucky he is to see one in real life. Telling the audience that he is ashamed of not recognizing the knuckleball while being a baseball announcer, life-long baseball fan and self-proclaimed knuckleball fanatic. Saying it is so rare that it even fooled him.

Of course, the compliments start pouring out of him. All of a sudden, I wasn’t a weak-armed pitcher, but a knuckleball expert that floats nasty pitches up to the plate, “carving” through their best hitters.

It is funny how a little perspective changes everything. The knuckle ball: so rare, it fools baseball television announcers.

 

Posted by Chris Nowlin

Knuckle Ball Pitcher – How to Get Noticed

Scouts at an open tryout aren’t likely to give the knuckleball any attention

Young, aspiring professional knuckle ball pitchers reach out to me here at Knuckleball Nation all the time. And one question I get a lot is this — How do I get noticed as a knuckleball pitcher? How do I break into the pro game? Can I go to an open Major League tryout and get signed?

That’s when I have to break the unfortunate news. You see, Major Leagues scouts, especially the ones at open tryouts, are directed to “scout” pitchers in a certain way. They have charts and matrixes telling them what velocity you need to be throwing at what age. These charts also tell them what height a pitcher should be at what age. Major League organizations send their scouts to school so they can learn how to rate a curveball, slider, changeup, splitter and so on. They are well trained and know exactly what they are looking for.

Unfortunately, they are not looking for you — the knuckleball pitcher.

There are no knuckleball scouts. There is no matrix on how to see a knuckleball and scouts are not trained to rate a knuckle ball. So, even if you show up to an open tryout, throw nasties at 70 miles-per-hour all day long, hit the catcher all over his body and get swings-and-misses from every batter, you still won’t even be ranked by the scout.

It is the plain and awful truth.

But this can be a good thing because it means you have to prove yourself in the aggregate. Knuckleball pitchers are marathon runners. We are designed to eat innings throughout the season and should be at the top of the leaders board in innings pitched every year. So, if you can find a place to throw a lot of quality innings against good competition, and all those innings are documented properly, then you can get noticed.

The numbers don’t lie.

This means finding a college. And any college will do; division III, even. It is important to find a coach willing to let you throw the butterfly out there. Then go out there, get tons of innings under your belt and develop that knuckleball in competitive games. Eventually, you’ll put up the kind of innings-eater numbers that can get you noticed. Make calls, send emails and don’t let yourself be forgotten. Get video of your outings. Show the world your Tim Wakefield-esque usefulness.

I got signed because Charlie Hough vouched for me. Zach Staniewicz got signed because Phil Niekro vouched for him. We didn’t get signed at an open tryout. We didn’t get seen once and had a scout coming pouring out of the stands with a contract. We got signed because the guys who know the knuckleball best said that we were good. But a scout? A scout doesn’t know a good knuckleball from a bad one. And he sure as heck won’t put his job on the line vouching for a pitch he doesn’t understand.

So go above him. Move up the ladder by putting together numbers in the aggregate in a competitive situation. Make so much noise that they can’t ignore you.

Posted by Chris Nowlin

2 Tips for a Better Knuckle Ball

Chris Nowlin at a single-A ballpark with college knuckleballer Jackson Bond

I was recently visited by an aspiring professional knuckleballer here in Northern California, where I am currently a starting minor league pitcher. His name is Jackson Bond, he’s 17 years old, from Dallas TX and throws left-handed. I wish I was left-handed because it would make it easy to deal with the running game. You could pitch with a full leg kick every time! I am jealous.

Jackson has a good knuckleball for his age. But working with him reminded me of a few things that everyone trying to develop this pitch should remember:

1. Don’t try to be someone else…

Jackson was warming up while playing catch with me. And I have a fairly unique way of throwing a baseball that helps me when I am pitching. My arm swings back in a long arch at glove break and then windmills up. If you freeze-frame me before the arm cock phase, it looks like I am carrying the baseball on a platter. Then I staple the ball to the back of my head before accelerating the knuckleball in a straight line at the plate. This gives me a little bit of deception because most long-armpitchers deliver the ball in a smooth arch, making it easier to time at the plate. I hide the ball right behind my head at the last minute, where it hangs up for a split second, right before I deliver the ball.

Jackson immediately asked me if he should do the same. And I immediately responded “No!”. You deliver the ball how you deliver the ball. You shouldn’t try to make major changes to your natural delivery. It will cause you frustration and delay your development. Learn really quick, right now, to be comfortable being you. Be you no matter how it looks. And be proud of it.

2. Process vs Result

Jackson would get fairly frustrated when the ball didn’t do what he wanted it do. In the beginning, we all do. But he was too focused on what was happening at the plate and was missing what was happening on the mound.

What happens at the plate is the result, which you CANNOT control! Don’t even try. Give up on controlling that right now. What happens on the mound is the process; the process of throwing the ball. This, you can control.

In baseball, the result USUALLY follows the process. If you complete the process well enough, the result will LIKELY be what you want. But it is not a direct relationship. It is not a cause-and-effect procedure. It is CORRELATED. That means a good process is LIKELY, not guaranteed, to produce a good result.

But what does this mean? Well, it means that you cannot control what happens at the plate. You could throw a knuckleball with ZERO spin and also get ZERO movement. But should you be upset if that pitch gets hit out of the park? NO! Absolutely not! You should be pumped that you controlled the process as well as you did. You executed on your end and when the ball is out of your hands, it is figuratively out of your hands. There is no more control. It is up to the wind, the baseball gods or the universe.

You cannot control the result… ever… not now and not in the future. Focus on the process, with all its fine moving parts, and the results will slowly start to follow your progress. Don’t fret at a bad knuckler. Don’t get down because the ball is spinning. Pick one adjustment that is critical for the knuckleball, focus on that, execute it well and live with the results. Once you nail that down, move on while keeping the adjustment itself as the goal. Every time you nail it, no matter the result, get excited that you are getting one step closer to you goal of being an MLB knuckleballer.

Posted by Chris Nowlin

How to Throw a Knuckleball and a Fastball for Strikes

Throw at the catcher’s mask to throw a knuckleball for a strike

I have been throwing one heck-u-va knuckleball these days. A fellow pro knuckleball friend of mine, Zach Staniewicz, and I have come up with a coding system for knuckleballs. “Chough Stuff”, pronounced CHUFF-STUFF, is the highest accolade for an individual knuckleball. Named after our mentor, Charlie Hough, these knuckleballs do no spin at all. Not one bit. Nada. Zilch.

You have probably thrown at least one Chough Stuff in your lifetime and it felt magical. That slight tingling in your fingertips as it left your hand. The majestic arch of a ball not spinning. The chaotic flight path and the dance of your catch partner all delight you.

Well, I have been throwing about 70% Chough Stuffs this year. No spin, crazy movement and no contact. But there is just one problem — it is really hard to control.

Charlie once told me that he got so good with the knuckleball, that at the end of his career, he had to throw more fastballs. “Why?” I asked Charlie. “So I wouldn’t walk so many,” Charlie replied.

And now I know what he means. My gosh!

I now, for the first time in my career, have to plan out my secondary pitches like a conventional pitcher in order to cut down on walks. I threw a knuckleball that got an audible “Wow!” from the crowd… and it was a ball! When it moves so much that the crowd behind the backstop can applaud a ball, you know you got it going on.

I’ve had strike three swing-and-misses got the backstop. Pitches come right down the middle of the zone called for balls because it fooled the umpire. I even have professional hitters swinging, making contact and looking the wrong way for the ball off of their bat. That’s right, my knuckleball is even fooling hitters that make a modicum of contact.

So I’ve gotten really good at placing four-seam fastballs in two places — low and away, and in on the hands. They are both effective in their own right, but you need to use them at the right time. And let’s be clear about something, my fastball is Wakefield-ian in its velocity. I am a classic knuckleballer with a fastball that ranges from 72 to 77 miles per hour. That brings my knuckleball in at anywhere from 55 at the slowest to 68 at the fastest. Just like good old Wake.

Low and away works for those love-to-pull power hitters. Usually, if you place it carefully enough, they’ll ignore it. They’ll just watch it sail by and wait for the next flutterball that they can wave a heavy swing at. Unless there are two strikes of course. Then they have to protect. But you can float one in for a strike. Or, better yet, have them foul an angry knuckleball off for a strike, and then go with this fastball to put them into a cripple count.

In on the hands will always work, as long as the hitter has seen the floater. You’ll catch them leaning out over the plate and you’ll stand them up. Psychologically, it will make them more susceptible to the next pitch — a knuckleball. Physically, it will get in under their hands and that inside pitch takes the longest time to swing at. The hitter has to pull in, clear the bat and punch the ball. That all takes time. Time they don’t have. So you can probably steal a strike on the way to a cripple count and a nasty knuck. Or, you can even lock them up for a strike out if you catch them really leaning. Just make sure the ump has established that inside corner during the game. Once the ump says it is a go with his calls early in the game, ATTACK! But use sparingly. Don’t get beat with you second-best pitches.

Posted by Chris Nowlin
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